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The Society for Women in Philosophy

 

SWIP UK is an organisation of UK women in philosophy, including students and professionals, working within or outside academic departments, which aims to end discrimination against women in philosophy.

SWIP UK is an organisation of UK women in philosophy, including students and professionals, working within or outside academic departments, which aims to end discrimination against women in philosophy.

The SWIP session will be held in a live Zoom call on Saturday, 17th July between 11:30 AM and 1:30 PM

The speakers of the SWIP Session

Tom McClelland and Paulina Sliwa, 11:30 AM

Gendered Affordance Perception

Domestic labour is often distributed in a gendered way, with women shouldering the greater domestic burden. Thislongstanding feminist concern has been brought into focus by the pan demic, with disparities persisting even with both partners at home. Social scientists have of fered various explanations for this disparity centred on how society promotes gender differ ences at the level of beliefs, desires and feelings. Though valuable, these explanations neglect the possibility ofsociety promoting gender differences at the level of perception. We propose an important gender disparity in whether and how women and men perceive affordances for domestic tasks.

Richard Rowland, 12 PM

Expressivism about Gender

Sarah McGrath proposes an expressivist account of gender thought and talk. I argue that we should reject this view as a descriptive account of all gender thought and talk. But I construct a new expressivist view of gender identity inspired by McGrath’s broader account and argue that we should accept it.

Amy Thompson, 12:30 PM

Is it felicitous to answer Plato’s Woman Question?

Feminist scholarship of Plato has been  concerned with the issue of his Philosopher Queens, i.e., the  admission of women to the guardian class. Recent scholarship  suggests that this may be a distraction from genuinely egalitarian  elements of Plato’s philosophy. In this paper, I argue that more than  distracting, such a focus may be insidious because (a) the nature of  the discussion obfuscates the claim, central to the communicative  aim of the feminist project in the history of philosophy, and (b) such  discussion may invite bad faith arguments in a discussion that  purports to construct the most emancipatory form of feminism.

Yuna Won, 1 PM

“Hepeating” and Discursive Alienation

Here I discuss a discursive phenomenon involving hepeating and attempt to locate the harm and wrongness of it. Hepeating happens in the following manner: a woman speaker proposes an idea, but there is no uptake of it; later her male colleague puts forward the very same idea, and everyone loves it. I argue that the harm and wrongness of hepeating are not fully explained in terms of credit or illocutionary silencing. Finally, I propose a new approach using the notion of discursive alienation to account for the unique discursive harm constituted by hepeating and problematize the discursive context of it.

 
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